14th January 2020

In_pictures In pictures: What Is Your London?

In_pictures In pictures: What Is Your London?

In_pictures

For seven weeks a group of young photographers aged between 18 and 24 took part in a workshop delivered by Create Jobs and Magnum Photos which asked them to produce pictures as a response to the question: What Is Your London?

They worked under the guidance of Magnum Photos associate Sohrab Hura as well as with the creative team at HudsonBec Group and alongside Emma Bowkett and Max Ferguson, who curated an exhibition of the work, entitled Please Mind the Flash.

Here’s a small selection of pictures from some of those who took part.

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In_pictures Kevin Chemuka

Originally from north-west London, Kevin Chemuka recently moved to the east of the city – which has opened his eyes to the diverse friendship groups surrounding him.

“What lessons are your friendships teaching you? Are they good or bad?”

in_pictures Iuri, music artistImage copyright
Kevin Chemuka

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Iuri Duarte, music artist: “I always try to stay positive because I’m grateful for everything I have. I’ve always made sure to set little goals, set dates, targets and achieve them. The sense of achievement is what keeps me motivated and in a positive mindset.”

Chemuka believes that we are the products of our environment and the sum of the people closest to us.

Through his work he seeks to encourage these observations as a conversation between young men.

The series is called My Role Models and tells the story of four friends and what it means to be a positive male role model.

in_pictures Jacob PerkinsImage copyright
Kevin Chemuka

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Jacob Perkins, musician and carer: “I’ve stayed a positive role model by constantly having my siblings around me. That alone has inspired me to remain a positive role model, even when things got tough. It’s motivated me – to help them be the best version of themselves I had to be strong. I grew up without a father figure present and learnt everything from my mum who was essentially two parents in one and my best friend. Losing her was the hardest thing my family will ever have to face but ultimately she shaped me to be a very understanding and caring soul.”

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In_pictures Tishon Nicholson

The Inner Me is a personal project focusing on four generations of the artist’s family. Through their stories we learn how they deal with being Black Caribbean women in the UK.

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Tishon Nicholson

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“My name is Lillybell and I was born in Jamaica. When I came to London for the very first time it was really difficult for me. I arrived in London during Windrush after World War Two. I recall arriving on the Friday and immediately going to work on Monday. There is still a discrimination towards people of colour, but when you look at it we all are one. Whether you are black or white, that’s just how it is.”

Nicholson’s desire to document this history is driven by what she sees as the lack of representation within mainstream media. As an exploration of what has changed and what has remained the same, these untold stories are voiced.

in_pictures Tishon NicholsonImage copyright
Tishon Nicholson

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“My name is Tishon and I was also born in north London. As a young adolescent growing up, I found the area in which I lived was extremely diverse and multicultural. I wasn’t truly aware of racism and discrimination at that age until I reached secondary school. I didn’t know how to define, nor express, the discrimination I experienced because of the colour of my skin. It wasn’t as apparent as derogatory racial slurs but came in many other forms, such as being followed around a shop by security or a woman clutching her bag tightly because you stood too close to her. Although times have changed, which has improved my quality of life and opportunities I receive, I still think we have a long way to go.”

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In_pictures Gwen Datyner

For women living in any city, travelling home late at night can be daunting, leaving them with feelings of high anxiety. A recent YouGov survey suggested nearly 50% of women said they always, or often, felt unsafe walking alone at night.

As an artist, Gwen Datyner wanted to create staged narratives that would explore this fear. To begin with, Datyner asked women on her Instagram feed and family and friends to describe what they did when travelling alone at night, to gain a better understanding of the precautions these women take.

She exaggerated these responses to create visual fantasies, magnifying the feeling of anxiety and concern.

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Gwen Datyner

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In_pictures Melissa Gardner

All Under One Roof Raving tells the story of London’s 2019 youth culture through nightlife, with a sharp focus on inclusivity.

While the documentation of music culture is at the core of this project, Gardner is keen to champion marginalised music communities.

in_pictures From the series All Under One Roof RavingImage copyright
Melissa Gardner

Gardner shows us a small slice of the hedonistic unification found on a London dance floor on any given weekend.

With an intention to react against social media’s filtered documentation of life, this series aims to show our city at 02:00 through a totally non-sugar-coated lens.

in_pictures From the series All Under One Roof RavingImage copyright
Melissa Gardner

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In_pictures Faith Aylward

Until fairly recently, Faith didn’t consider herself a Londoner. She had a transient relationship with the city – often in and out, either staying there on holiday or when it served as a temporary home.

Through this project, Faith wanted to create the still images of a movie, as if her life was portrayed as one.

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Faith Aylward

She has now lived here full-time for two years – years which have been full of intense self-discovery, experimentation, adventure and change for her.

This series is composed of constructed scenes depicting experiences she’s had and aspects of life here that she’s become familiar with. The work tells the story of how London, and the journey she has been on there, have shaped who she is today.

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In_pictures Capella Buncher

Inspired by anger she feels at the way poor people are demonised in the British media, Buncher responded to the brief with a project that concentrates on the daily lives of her working-class family.

in_pictures From a series by Capella BuncherImage copyright
Capella Buncher

in_pictures From a series by Capella BuncherImage copyright
Capella Buncher

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In_pictures Ellie Radford

Ellie Radford began her journey chasing the allure of fashion and the art form of clothing. Her own personal journey has opened her eyes to the fragmented reality of this industry where creativity is intertwined with idolisation and the challenges of femininity.

This series is part of a larger project investigating the connotations of colour associations and how these can be used as a form of silent communication.

in_pictures From the series Is Paradise An Island Of Perfection?Image copyright
Ellie Radford

in_pictures From the series Is Paradise An Island Of Perfection?Image copyright
Ellie Radford

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In_pictures Bilimae Latimer

The still life in this exhibition is shown alongside a poem written for the project by K, the girlfriend of a victim of knife crime.

The picture was produced as part of a series documenting the rise of knife crime, specifically across the London borough of Barking and Dagenham.

in_pictures Photograph of a knifeImage copyright
Bilimae Latimer

Photographer Bilimae Latimer, herself a resident of the borough, started this project with the intention of opening up a conversation to a wider audience around the impact of the rise in violence in deprived areas. The project seeks to underline the importance of protecting the borough’s young people and investment in them.

The use of purple within the image acknowledges the purple ribbon campaign started by the family of Jodie Chesney, a resident of Barking and Dagenham, one of the most recent victims of the violence.

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Creativity Works: Visual Storytelling is a Mayor’s Fund for London programme, supported by Berkeley Foundation, Citi Foundation and Arts Council England, and delivered by Create Jobs at A New Direction and Magnum Photos in partnership with the HudsonBec Group.

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