12th June 2020

In_pictures Coronavirus: Pandemic photographs shared to create archive

In_pictures Coronavirus: Pandemic photographs shared to create archive

In_pictures

in_pictures Lough Leane, KilarneyImage copyright
Paul O’Shea

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People are being encouraged to share images of the changing landscape during the pandemic

Pictures of rainbows, decorated trees and painted stones, as well as coronavirus-related graffiti, are being collected for a photographic archive.

Thousands of people were moved to create artwork during the lockdown and researchers are keen to capture the spirit of the time for posterity.

The Viral Archive project is being put together by researchers in Coventry, Cork and London.

About 600 photographs from around the world have so far been submitted.

But the researchers would like more.

Image copyright
Bronwen Thomas

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The project aims to gather images of signs, art and graffiti along with murals like this in Poole Park, Poole

Rosie Everett, from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick, said she had been working with “a mixed bunch of archaeologists” from University College Cork (UCC) and University College London (UCL) on the project while unable to carry out any of her usual field research.

It is hoped the archive will show the changes that occur in the landscape due to the global crisis – pinpointing a moment in time, she said.

Image copyright
Cyran Dorman

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Cyran Dorman who submitted this photograph from Liverpool said the message was ‘heartbreaking’

“The pandemic isn’t a positive experience for anybody – we understand the harsh realities of people that are suffering – but we also wanted to try and capture the light cutting through,” she said.

Image copyright
Paul O’Shea

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Paul O’Shea said he photographed a sign with these words by Seamus Heaney whilst on his morning run in Killarney, Ireland

Image copyright
Kelly Smith

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Photographer Kelly Smith said the display at a care home in Bulkington, Warwickshire has developed over the weeks

She encouraged people to recognise and capture the changes in their local environment and share the images on the project’s Twitter feed @Viral_Archive.

The photographs will eventually be downloaded and put in a permanent archive at UCC.

Image copyright
Charlotte Frearson

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The research has set out to capture a ‘timeline’ of the pandemic, including the political response

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