13th July 2020

In_pictures M1 crash: Lamborghini wrecked after 20 minutes

In_pictures M1 crash: Lamborghini wrecked after 20 minutes

In_pictures

in_pictures The damaged LamborghiniImage copyright
West Yorkshire Police

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Police said the Lamborghini had been hit from behind after it stopped on the M1

A newly-bought Lamborghini was wrecked after just 20 minutes on the roads, police said.

The luxury sports car, believed to be worth about £200,000, was damaged in a crash on the M1 in West Yorkshire.

The Lamborghini was hit from behind by a van after stopping in the outside lane because of a “mechanical failure”, West Yorkshire Police said.

The driver of the van suffered head injuries in the collision, although they were not thought to be serious.

A police officer from West Yorkshire shared pictures of the crash, near Ossett on Wednesday, and said that although “it’s only a car” he “could have cried”.

Officers were called just after 13:00 BST to a reports of a two-vehicle collision near junction 40 of the M1.

Part of the motorway was shut while the van and Lamborghini were moved.

Image copyright
West Yorkshire Police

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There were delays on motorway following the collision

The motorist has not been identified and it is not known where the Lamborghini was bought and whether it was new or used.

However, similar models to the one involved in the crash are listed for sale online from between £150,000 and £250,000.


Follow BBC Yorkshire on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Send your story ideas to yorkslincs.news@bbc.co.uk.

13th July 2020

In_pictures Coronavirus: PM’s father Stanley Johnson criticised for lockdown trip to Greece

In_pictures Coronavirus: PM’s father Stanley Johnson criticised for lockdown trip to Greece

In_pictures

in_pictures Stanley JohnsonImage copyright
PA Media

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Stanley Johnson posted pictures of his arriving in Athens on Wednesday

Boris Johnson’s father has been criticised for travelling to Greece during the coronavirus lockdown.

Stanley Johnson shared a number of pictures on his Instagram account on Wednesday, showing him arriving in Athens and at an airport in a mask.

He told the Daily Mail he was in the country “on essential business” to ensure a property he rents out was “Covid-proof” before holidays restart.

But the former Tory MEP has come under fire for breaking lockdown rules.

Liberal Democrat MP Jamie Stone said the incident “stinks of one rule for them and another rule for the rest of us”.

When asked about his father’s behaviour, the prime minister told LBC: “I think you really ought to raise that with him.”

The current guidance on air travel from the UK Foreign Office advises against “all but essential international travel” because of the virus.

Anyone who then returns to the UK has to isolate for 14 days, under the government’s existing rules.

Liberal Democrat MP Alistair Carmichael raised concerns in the Commons, saying the prime minister could “explain his views on the fact that apparently his own father has jetted off in defiance of the guidance to Greece”.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionAlistair Carmichael quizzes Jacob Rees-Mogg on the trip

Referencing reasons given by Boris Johnson’s most senior aide, Dominic Cummings, when he was accused of breaking the lockdown rules in March, Mr Carmichael added: “Maybe, I don’t know, he just needed an eye test or something like that, but I think we would all welcome an explanation.”

Answering for the government, Commons leader Jacob Rees-Mogg said: “I seem to remember somewhere in the Bible that the sins of the father will be visited on the son, but I don’t remember it ever being the other way round.

“I think that the honourable gentleman is really fishing desperately to try and make any criticism of the PM.”

People arriving in England from more than 50 countries including France, Spain, Germany and Italy will no longer need to quarantine from 10 July, the Department for Transport has confirmed.

The Scottish and Welsh government have yet to announce any changes to regulations, while in Northern Ireland, quarantine remains in place for travellers arriving from outside the UK and the Republic of Ireland.

13th July 2020

In_pictures In pictures: Scotland v England 1967

In_pictures In pictures: Scotland v England 1967

In_pictures

Image copyright
PA

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Fans and players celebrated the victory at the full time whistle

On 15 April 1967, Scotland secured one of their most famous footballing victories.

Taking on reigning world champions England at Wembley, they won the match 3-2.

Here are a selection of some of the iconic images of the game.

Image copyright
PA

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Jack Charlton was injured early but played on and scored one of England’s two goals

Image copyright
PA

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Denis Law opened the scoring at Wembley

Image copyright
PA

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Bobby Lennox made it 2-0 for Scotland

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PA

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Jim McCalliog scored Scotland’s third goal in the famous game

Image copyright
PA

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Geoff Hurst scored England’s second goal late in the game

Image copyright
PA

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Fans poured out on to the pitch in celebration of the win

13th July 2020

In_pictures Week in pictures: 20-26 June 2020

In_pictures Week in pictures: 20-26 June 2020

In_pictures

A selection of powerful news photographs taken around the world this week.

in_pictures Musicians on stage perform to an auditorium full of plantsImage copyright
Jordi Vidal / Getty Images

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Musicians perform to an unusual audience, as Barcelona’s Gran Teatre del Liceu opera house reopened its doors with a concert for plants. Following the event, the opera house planned to donate the plants to 2,292 healthcare professionals.

in_pictures A man holding a sign sits aloneImage copyright
Jabin Botsford / The Washington Post via Getty Ima

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A supporter sits alone as US Vice President Mike Pence speaks before President Donald Trump’s arrival at a campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

in_pictures South Korean performers dressed as soldiers participate in a re-enactmentImage copyright
Chung Sung-Jun / Getty Images

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South Korean performers dressed as soldiers participate in a re-enactment.

in_pictures Servicemen march during a Victory Day military paradeImage copyright
Kirill Yasko / Host Photo Agency via Getty Images

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Servicemen take part in a Victory Day military parade marking the 75th anniversary of the end of World War Two, in Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, Russia. The event was postponed from its original date of 9 May because of the coronavirus pandemic.

in_pictures A statue of John C Calhoun is lifted from its pedestalImage copyright
Sean Rayford

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A statue of John C Calhoun, a former US Vice President and advocate of slavery, is removed from Marion Square in Charleston, South Carolina.

in_pictures People practise yoga in individual transparent domesImage copyright
Carlos Osorio / REUTERS

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People participate in a socially distanced yoga class, in Toronto, Canada.

in_pictures A girl looks through an eclipse viewer on an elevated, transparent platform, with buildings and roads in the distance below herImage copyright
Athit Perawongmetha / REUTERS

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A girl observes a partial solar eclipse on the Mahanakhon Skywalk Glass Tray at the King Power Mahanakhon building in Bangkok, Thailand.

in_pictures Devotees covered in mud and dried banana leaves light candles and pray outside a closed churchImage copyright
Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

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Devotees covered in mud and dried banana leaves light candles and pray outside a closed church to celebrate the Taong Putik Festival in the village of Bibiclat in the Philippines.

in_pictures A man dives into water in the London Docklands, as two other men in inflatable boats watchImage copyright
Victoria Jones / PA Wire

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A man dives into the water near Canary Wharf, London.

in_pictures A woman completes her ballot in a voting boothImage copyright
A woman completes her ballot in a voting booth

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A voter completes her ballot on the day of the primary election in Louisville, Kentucky, USA.

All photographs belong to the copyright holders as marked.

13th July 2020

In_pictures Coronavirus: South Shields Museum appeals for hair clippings

In_pictures Coronavirus: South Shields Museum appeals for hair clippings

In_pictures

in_pictures Plaits of hair from Catherine CooksonImage copyright
South Tyneside Museum

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Catherine Cookson’s plaits may date from her late teenage years, the museum suggests

A museum is appealing for people’s hair following their first trim since the coronavirus lockdown was eased in England.

Hairdressers are among the businesses that have reopened after having been closed since March.

South Shields Museum is asking people to provide before-and-after photographs as well as the clippings.

Among the museum’s existing collection of hair cuttings are plaits that once belonged to author Catherine Cookson.

Adam Bell, assistant keeper of social history, said donations would form part of the museum’s pandemic collection and used in future displays documenting life amid the outbreak.

In_pictures ‘Building a story’

“We wanted to do something a little bit different,” he said.

“The pandemic is a major world event and probably the biggest thing to have had to face since the Second World War.

“We’ve been collecting materials that might be considered the usual suspects, such as rainbow pictures and items of PPE, but we want to represent the other things that people have missed during the last three-and-a-half months.

“One of those things is haircuts. People have not been able to get a trim and so there will quite a bit of hair coming off.

“It also helps build up a story. We can ask how that person has found lockdown.”

Mr Bell said “many museums” hold examples of hair with Victorian mourning jewellery often including a lock as a memento.

It was also gifted plaits following the death of the South Shields writer Catherine Cookson in 1998.

People in South Tyneside who would like to take part are asked to check the museum’s website for further details and must contact Mr Bell for details of what is required before sending any hair.

Follow BBC North East & Cumbria on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Send your story ideas to northeastandcumbria@bbc.co.uk.

13th July 2020

In_pictures Met PCs suspended over photos of double murder scene

In_pictures Met PCs suspended over photos of double murder scene

In_pictures

in_pictures Nicole and BibaaImage copyright
Met Police

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Nicole Smallman and Bibaa Henry had been celebrating Ms Henry’s birthday before they were reported missing

Two Met Police officers have been suspended after “inappropriate photos” were taken at the crime scene of a double murder.

The unnamed officers were arrested by the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) on 22 June and have since been bailed.

The bodies of sisters Bibaa Henry and Nicole Smallman were found earlier this month at Fryent Gardens in Wembley.

Commander Paul Brogden said he was “horrified” by the allegations.

He added senior officers from the Met and the IOPC visited the sisters’ family to inform them of the serious allegations.

In_pictures ‘Morally reprehensible’

“This deeply disturbing information will no doubt have created additional trauma for a family who are already grieving the devastating loss of two loved ones,” Commander Brogden said.

“I am horrified and disgusted by the nature of these allegations; a sentiment which will be shared by colleagues throughout the organisation.

“If true, these actions are morally reprehensible and anyone involved will be robustly dealt with.”

Ms Smallman, 27, had been with friends celebrating Ms Henry’s 46th birthday at the park on the evening of 5 June.

Image copyright
@999London

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A 36-year-old man arrested in south London on suspicion of murder was released with no further action.

Detectives believe the sisters were killed by a stranger who repeatedly stabbed them in the early hours of 6 June – their bodies were not found until the following day.

In a statement the Met said two officers from the North East Command unit had both been suspended from duty.

Image copyright
Met Police

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Images recovered from their phones – which were found in a pond – showed the sisters dancing with fairy lights hours before they were killed

The force said its directorate of professional standards was told last week about allegations that “non-official and inappropriate photographs” had been taken at the crime scene.

The IOPC said the pictures were allegedly “shared with a small number of others”, adding the Met was “handling matters involving those members of the public who may have received those images”.

Since their bodies were found forensic officers have been searching a large area of the park including a pond and have trawled through hundreds of thousands of tonnes of rubbish that was accidently cleared from the scene.

Detectives believe the killer received injuries in the attack “which caused significant bleeding”.

The IOPC is also separately investigating how the Met handled calls from worried family and friends of the sisters after they went missing.

For more London news follow on Facebook, on Twitter, on Instagram and subscribe to our YouTube channel.

13th July 2020

In_pictures In pictures: Cairngorms’ ‘snowy fields’ of bog cotton

In_pictures In pictures: Cairngorms’ ‘snowy fields’ of bog cotton

In_pictures

in_pictures CottongrassImage copyright
Rishane Brenner Colas/Into The Wild Conservation

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Bog cotton is a plant called sedge that grows in bogs across the UK

The fluffy heads of cottongrass have left parts of the Cairngorms looking like they are covered in a dusting of snow.

The plant, also known as bog cotton and ghost grass, grows in bogs across the UK and Ireland.

in_pictures Bog cotton in the CairngormsImage copyright
Pete Crane

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Cottongrass in the Cairngorms

The sedge develops its white fluffy seed-heads in early summer, and conservationists have described this year’s “display” as particularly striking.

In the Cairngorms, boggy ground in and around RSPB Scotland’s Abernethy reserve have been transformed by fluffy cottongrass.

Pete Crane, head of visitor services at the Cairngorms National Park Authority, said they had never seen so much flowering bog cotton.

in_pictures CottongrassImage copyright
Rishane Brenner Colas/Into The Wild Conservation

Image caption

The plant develops fluffy seed-heads in early summer

In the past, the seed-heads have been used as a substitute for feathers in pillows and the wicks for candles, according to the charity Plantlife.

It said in Scotland the fibres were used for dressing the wounds of soldiers injured in World War One.

in_pictures CottongrassImage copyright
Rishane Brenner Colas/Into The Wild Conservation

Image caption

Ghost grass is another name given to the sedge

All images are copyrighted.

13th July 2020

In_pictures Africa’s week in pictures: 12-18 June 2020

In_pictures Africa’s week in pictures: 12-18 June 2020

In_pictures

A selection of the week’s best photos from across the continent and beyond.

in_pictures A member of Radikal Bomb Shot (RBS) collective, a collective of Senegalese artists, paints a mural depicting key American and African anti-racism activists, in a show of support for the Black Lives Matter movement in Dakar on June, 15, 2020.Image copyright
AFP

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On Monday in Senegal’s capital city, Dakar, artists from the Radikal Bomb Shot collective paint a mural in tribute to African and African-American activists…

in_pictures Members of Radikal Bomb Shot (RBS) collective, a collective of Senegalese artists, paint a mural of key American and African anti-racism activists in a show of support for the Black Lives Matter movement in Dakar on June, 15, 2020.Image copyright
Getty Images

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Part of their mural quotes Senegalese scholar Cheikh Anta Diop, saying: “The negation of black Africans’ history and intellectual achievements was the cultural, mental murder which proceeded and paved the way for genocide in the world.”

in_pictures Volunteers of the association Retake clean a statue of famous Italian journalist Indro Montanelli, which stands in a garden of the same name, that was sprayed painted red and tagged with the words racist and rapist, in Milan, Italy, 14 June 2020. An anti-fascist group had called on MilanImage copyright
EPA

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In Italy there are calls to remove a statue of Indro Montanelli, pictured on Sunday having been daubed in red paint and tagged with the words “racist, rapist”. The journalist admitted buying and marrying a 12-year-old Eritrean girl in the 1930s during army service under Fascist leader Benito Mussolini.

in_pictures Protesters lock arms during an antiracism protest on June 13, 2020 in Paris, France. The anti-racism protests here that began with expressions of solidarity with George Floyd, the American man who was killed by police in Minneapolis, have also highlighted the case of Adama Traore, a 24-year-old French Malian man who died in police custody in 2016.Image copyright
Getty Images

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In Paris on Saturday, protesters demand justice for Adama Traoré, a 24-year-old man who died in police custody four years ago in circumstances likened to George Floyd’s death in the US. An autopsy requested by Traoré’s family showed that he died of asphyxiation.

in_pictures This picture taken on June 18, 2020, shows a statue of King Leopold II of Belgium besmirched with red paint, in Gent. - The statue will be removed, amidst discussions to topple all Leopold 2 statues due to the misdeeds in his former colony Congo.Image copyright
AFP

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Following campaigns and protests the Belgian city of Ghent is to remove this statue of King Leopold II, under whose reign as many as 10 million people were murdered in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo.

in_pictures Presentational white space

in_pictures Demonstrators stand next to the statue of Louis Botha on horseback, the first prime minister of the Union of South Africa, during a demonstration calling for the removal of the statue in front of the South African Parliament, in Cape Town on June 16, 2020.Image copyright
AFP

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On Tuesday in Cape Town activists call for the removal of this colonial-era statue of Louis Botha, the first prime minister of South Africa.

in_pictures A man rests on the octagon surrounding the destroyed plinth upon which a colonial era statue of H.M. Queen Victoria had stood in memoria since itImage cop

13th July 2020

Technology Biden challenges Trump with ‘Buy American’ economic plan

Technology Biden challenges Trump with ‘Buy American’ economic plan

Technology

Technology The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks at McGregor Industries in Dunmore, PennsylvaniaImage copyright
Getty Images

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Joe Biden lambasted US President Donald Trump, arguing he failed to deliver on his economic promises

Democratic presidential contender Joe Biden has laid out his rescue plan for the coronavirus-crippled US economy, while berating President Donald Trump as incompetent.

Mr Biden said his $700bn (£560bn) plan would be the biggest investment in the US economy since World War Two.

The “Build Back Better” agenda, he said, would spur a manufacturing and technology jobs boom.

The Trump campaign responded that the plan would inflict “catastrophe”.

Mr Biden is all but guaranteed to face off with Mr Trump in this November’s presidential election.

Speaking at a metalworks firm near his childhood hometown of Scranton, Pennsylvania, on Thursday, Mr Biden said the president’s failures had “come with a terrible human cost and a deep economic toll”.

“Time and again, working families are paying the price for this administration’s incompetence,” Mr Biden said.

November’s election is expected to be dominated by the coronavirus pandemic and its economic fallout, which has pushed tens of millions of Americans into unemployment. More than 130,000 people have died with the virus.

Many voters are concerned by the Trump administration’s handling of the pandemic. His divisive approach to the country’s recent wave of anti-racism protests has also come under sharp scrutiny.

Opinion polls show Mr Biden with an almost double-digit lead over Mr Trump.

Analysts have urged caution in over-interpreting the polls, but Mr Biden’s lead is far greater than that of Mr Trump’s 2016 opponent Hillary Clinton at the same point in the campaign.

Technology What else did Mr Biden say in his speech?

The former vice-president, who served under Barack Obama, struck an optimistic tone as he presented an economic programme, which he said would create at least five million jobs in manufacturing and innovation.

A key theme of his plan, Mr Biden said, was to “Buy American”. He proposed a $400bn increase in government spending on US-made products, in addition to spending $300bn on the research and development of new technologies, including electric vehicles and 5G networks.

“When the federal government spends taxpayers’ money, we should use it to buy American products and support American jobs,” he said

Pennsylvania is a battleground state seen as critical to the outcome of the election. Mr Trump won it in 2016 by a thin margin.

The “Buy American” tagline has drawn comparisons to President’s Trump’s “American First” agenda.

But Mr Biden said Mr Trump had failed to “bring back jobs and manufacturing” and, during the pandemic, had protected wealthy “cronies and pals” instead of working-class families.

“The truth is throughout this crisis, Donald Trump has been almost singularly focused on the stock market, the Dow and NASDAQ. Not you. Not your families,” Mr Biden said.

The Trump campaign took a dim view of Mr Biden’s economic proposals.

“Mr Biden’s wilful attack on our jobs, our families, and the American way of life will reverse all the gains we’ve made together and plunge us into economic catastrophe,” spokesman Hogan Gidley said.

Technology Where are we in the election race?

Mr Biden, 77, officially secured the Democratic presidential nomination in June. He had been the effective nominee since left-wing Bernie Sanders withdrew from the race in April.

It is Mr Biden’s third bid for the presidency, after failed runs in 1988 and 2008.

Mr Obama endorsed Mr Biden in April, saying in a video that his former vice-president had “all the qualities we need in a president right now”.

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionBarack Obama endorses Joe Biden’s 2020 presidential bid

A former US Senator from Delaware, Mr Biden is yet to choose his running mate – the person who would become vice-president should he be elected. Kamala Harris, a Democratic senator from California, is considered the front-runner.

Both the Democratic and Republican party conventions are scheduled for August. At those events, delegates will formally choose each party’s nominees for president and vice-president in the 2020 election, due to take place on 3 November.

13th July 2020

Technology Ex-Googler becomes China’s second richest person

Technology Ex-Googler becomes China’s second richest person

Technology

Technology Colin Huang

Image caption

Pinduoduo’s Colin Huang is still valued at about $5bn less than Tencent’s founder

A former Google employee was briefly ranked the second richest person in China, following a surge in sales at his e-commerce business, Pinduoduo.

Colin Huang was valued at $45.4bn (£36.4bn) by Forbes, on Sunday, ahead of Alibaba’s Jack Ma but behind Tencent’s Pony Ma.

Mr Huang was previously an intern at Microsoft and then spent three years as an engineer at Google.

“These three years were incredibly valuable to me,” he blogged in 2016.

“Google gave me far more than I contributed.”

According to Forbes, a slip in Pinduoduo’s value has since given Mr Ma back the second spot.

Technology Shopping games

Mr Huang founded Pinduoduo in 2015.

And the company became particularly popular in China during the Covid-19 pandemic, with orders increasing from 50 million to nearly 65 million per day.

Its novel features include team buying, where customers come together to purchase more units at a lower price.

Customers can also play games on the site and are sometimes rewarded with free gifts.

Image copyright
Pinduoduo

In his 2016 blog, Mr Huang said some early Google employees had been adversely affected by quickly becoming wealthy.

“They suddenly got too much money, lost incentives to work and started to look for fun and new careers,” he wrote.

“Many years passed and they wasted their most precious time, when they were most likely to have other outstanding achievements.”

Mr Huang still has some way to go to catch up with the world’s richest technology billionaire, Jeff Bezos.

Forbes currently estimates the Amazon founder is worth $162.2bn.

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